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Monday 17 December 2018
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Avoid Injury and Shock by Handling Electricity With Care, and With the Right Tools

Gages

Did you know that 1,000 Americans die from electric shock every year, and another 30,000 sustain electrical injuries? Wires cause injury, start fires, and, sometimes, even kill. Many of these wires may not be up to standards. Whether working at home, or in a professional environment, many handymen, and women, lack the proper tools to test wiring for essential properties, all of them contributing to handling safety. What equipment can U.S. men and women use to test tools and wires, and work with electricity safely?

Fluke Test Lead Sets

Fluke test sets can prevent injury, and, at times, even save your life. These test sets, simply put, use digital multimeter (DMM) gages to verify different tools’ safety. As long as test leads are well-maintained, and in good, working condition, these tools can safeguard you against electric shock, and hazardous fires. How can you be sure? A simple visual check of fluke test lead sets will help you detect most problems. Before using test leads, always check for nicks, cracks, fraying, and any other signs of visible wear. If you use test leads particularly frequently, it is a good idea to replacement them often, or at least once a year.

Electronic Calibration

Staying safe while working with electricity and live wires can be pretty basic. Wear hard hats, work with insulated, often rubber or plastic-handled tools, and avoid watches, jewelry, keys that can conduct electricity. What may not be as apparent is properly gauging electric current, or meeting calibration standards. It is especially important that all tools and equipment, when working with electricity, are carefully calibrated. Meter calibration tools can keep important readings, and important tasks, as precise and accurate as possible.

When you are working with electricity and live wires, there is little room for error. Use test lead sets and electronic calibration equipment to stay as precise, accurate, and safe as possible. Research more like this.




15 thoughts on “Avoid Injury and Shock by Handling Electricity With Care, and With the Right Tools

  1. Gordon Risher

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  2. Zachary Webb

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  3. Kyle Wolfe

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  4. Sydney George

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  5. Sophia Rhodes

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  6. Marc Risher

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  7. Addison Lyons

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  8. Ernest Wilson

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  9. Leon Lewis

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  10. Mark Coleman

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  11. Rene Miles

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  12. Sophie Harrison

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  13. Alexander Castillo

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  14. Scarlett Dawson

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

  15. Marvin Bryant

    Solid advice. I think it’s definitely important to work with the right tools (and properly calibrated, too) in general. Usually, there is much more room for error though. An off-kilter saw may result in a crooked cut, but not shock/death.

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